Final Program

ADVANCES IN OPTICS FOR
BIOTECHNOLOGY, MEDICINE AND SURGERY

22-27 July, 2001
Banff Centre for Conferences
Banff, Alberta, Canada

Conference Co-Chairs:
Daniel Farkas
Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, USA
Michele Follen
University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, USA
Michael Patterson
Hamilton Regional Cancer Centre and McMaster University, Canada

United Engineering Foundation, Inc.
Three Park Avenue, 27th Floor
New York, NY 10016-5902 T: 1-212-591-7836 - F: 1-212-591-7441
E: engfnd@aol.com - www.engfnd.org

The conference organizers thank the following for their generous financial support:

Canadian Institute for Photonic Innovations
The Whitaker Foundation
U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Biological and Environmental Research
U. S. National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute
U. S. National Institutes of Health, Office of Rare Diseases
Hamamatsu Corporation
Johnson and Johnson
Mallinckrodt, Inc.
Nikon
Rio Grande Medical Technologies
Roche Diagnostics
Thorlabs, Inc.

Sunday, July 22, 2001

4:00 pm - 6:00 pm Registration

6:00 pm - 7:30 pm Dinner

8:00 pm - 10:00 pm SESSION: PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY: THE MICRO PERSPECTIVE
Chair: Brian Wilson, Ontario Cancer Institute

Functional and structural PDT responses at the single cell level
Lothar Lilge, Ontario Cancer Institute

Microvascular effects of PDT
Victor Fingar, University of Louisville

Photodynamic therapy at the sub-micron length scale: applications of multiphoton excitation
David Cramb, University of Calgary

Cell culture in three dimensions: the multicell spheroid as a model system for PDT dosimetry
Tom Foster, University of Rochester

10:00 pm - 11:00 pm Opening reception

IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENTS

UEF Conferences are smoke-free. Please do not smoke at any conference function.
Please turn off (or turn to vibrate) your cell phone during technical sessions

Monday, July 23, 2001

07:00 am - 08:15 am Breakfast Buffet

08:30 am - 12:00 noon SESSION: NEW OPTICAL SENSING TECHNOLOGIES
Chair: Joe Lakowicz, University of Maryland

Engineering radiative decay
Joe Lakowicz, University of Maryland

Reliable non-invasive nano-sensors and real-time imaging of sub-cellular chemistry
Raoul Kopelman, University of Michigan

10:00 am - 10:30 am Coffee Break

Lanthanide chelates: luminescent probes for biomedical imaging, radio-active complexes for site-directed therapy and photosensitizers for PDT
Darryl J. Bornhop, Texas Tech University

Optical sensor microarrays for diagnostics and biochemical imaging
David Walt, Tufts University

12:00 pm - 1:30 pm Lunch

1:30 pm - 4:00 pm Ad hoc sessions/free time

6:30 pm - 8:00 pm Dinner

8:00 pm - 10:00 pm SESSION: IN VIVO SPECTROSCOPY AND SPECTROSCOPIC IMAGING
Chair: Rebecca Richards-Kortum, University of Texas, Austin

Fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging for in vivo detection of oral cancer
Ann Gillenwater, M.D.Anderson

Photomedical techniques for identification of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque
Eric Ryan, InfraReDx

Intra-vital imaging to monitor metastasis
John Condeelis, Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Fluorescence and Raman studies in Barrett's esophagus: where do we go from here?
Brian Wilson, Ontario Cancer Institute

10:00 pm - 11:00 pm Social Hour

Tuesday, July 24, 2001

07:00 am - 08:30 am Breakfast Buffet

08:30 am - 12:00 noon SESSION: DIFFUSE LIGHT IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY
Chair: Arjun Yodh, University of Pennsylvania

Are sub-millimeter length scales or highly absorbing tissues beyond the reach of photon migration?
Vasan Venugoplan, University of California Irvine

Clinical near infrared tomography for breast cancer characterization
Brian Pogue, Dartmouth College

10:00 am - 10:30 am Coffee Break

Diffuse optical imaging of brain and breast
Joseph Culver, University of Pennsylvania

Optical imaging of brain activity
Arno Villringer, Charite Hospital/Humboldt University

12:00 pm - 1:30 pm Lunch

1:30 pm - 4:00 pm Ad hoc sessions/free time

6:30 pm - 8:00 pm Dinner

8:00 pm - 10:00 pm SESSION: POSTER SESSION
Chairs: Bruce Tromberg and Eva Sevick-Muraca

10:00 pm - 11:00 pm Social Hour

Wednesday, July 25, 2001

07:00 am - 08:30 am Breakfast Buffet

08:30 am - 12:00 noon SESSION: MICROSCOPIC AND MESOSCOPIC IMAGING
Chair: Stefan Hell, Max Planck Institute, Goettingen

Sharpening up the confocal fluorescence microscope
Stefan Hell, Max Planck Institute, Goettingen

Second harmonic imaging microscopy of living cells
Paul Campagnola, University of Connecticut

10:00 am - 10:30 am Coffee Break

Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy of living cells
Ji-Xin Cheng, Harvard University

Membrane imaging by second-harmonic generation microscopy
Jerome Mertz, INSERM, Paris

Precision low coherence interferometry for cell biology
Adam Wax, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

12:00 pm - 1:30 pm Lunch

1:30 pm - 4:00 pm Ad hoc sessions/free time

6:30 pm - 8:00 pm Dinner

8:00 pm - 10:00 pm SESSION: OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY
Chair: Jim Fujimoto, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

New techniques for OCT
Adolph Fercher, University of Vienna

Ultrahigh resolution and functional OCT
Jim Fujimoto, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Endoscopic OCT
Andrew Rollins, Case Western Reserve University

Imaging in glaucoma: ophthalmic clinical applications of OCT
Joel Schumann, New England Eye Center

10:00 pm - 11:00 pm Social Hour

Thursday, July 26, 2001

07:00 am - 08:30 am Breakfast Buffet

08:30 am - 12:00 noon SESSION: BIOTECHNOLOGY: GENOMICS AND MEDICINE
Chair: Vicki Baker, Wayne State University

Reliable and cost effective genetic diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutics
Elizabeth Petty, University of Michigan

Cellular elasticity and molecular markers
Josef Kas, University of Texas

10:00 am - 10:30 am Coffee Break

Genomics and optical diagnosis in the lung
Calum Macaulay, University of British Columbia

Laser-guided direct writing for applications in biotechnology
David Odde, University of Minnesota

12:00 pm - 1:30 pm Lunch

1:30 pm - 4:00 pm Ad hoc sessions/free time

4:00 pm - 6:00 pm SESSION: CLINICAL NEEDS AND ENGINEERING SOLUTIONS
Chair: Michele Follen, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Major health problems in the developing and developed worlds
Guillermo Tortolero-Luna, University of Texas, M. D. Anderson

Clinical trial design
Lemuel Moye, University of Texas School of Public Health

Microfluidic devices and their clinical potential
Piotr Grodzinski, Motorola MEMS Laboratory

Optics in the rhesus and human: models for ovarian cancer
Molly Brewer, University of Texas, M. D. Anderson

7:00 pm - 9:00 pm Conference Banquet

9:00 pm - 10:00 pm Social Hour

Friday, July 27, 2001

07:00 am - 08:30 am Breakfast Buffet

08:30 am - 12:00 noon SESSION: INFORMAL CONFERENCE FEEDBACK AND PLANNING
Chairs: Mike Patterson, Dan Farkas, Michele Follen

Lunch (and departure)

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POSTERS

1. Clinical Demonstration of Autofluorescence Spectroscopy for the Identification of Tissue Pathologies
O.M. A'Amar, F. Guillemin
Laboratoire de Recherche en Instrumentation Medicale Automatisee en Cancerologie (IMAC) - CRAN, Centre Alexis Vautrin, FRANCE

2. Correction if Fluorescence Spectra Using Data From Elastic Scattering Spectroscopy and an Approximation of Beer's Law
Ousama A'Amar and Irving Bigio
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, USA

3. Measurement of the Binding Force Between Von Willebrand Factor Variants and Glycoprotein IB-IX Using Optical Tweezers
Maneesh Arya, Joel Moake and Bahman Anvari
Rice University, USA
Gabriel Romo and Jose Lopez
Baylor College of Medicine, USA

4. Raman Spectroscopy of Hemoglobin and Myoglobin
Andrew Berger and Anjul Maheshwari
The Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, USA

5. Functional and Structural Imaging of Tumors Using Co-Registration of Near-Infrared Tissue Spectroscopy and MRI
Frederic Bevilacqua, Bruce J. Tromberg, David Cucia and Ryan Lanning
Beckman Laser Institute, University of California Irvine, USA
Gultekin Gulsen, Hon Yu
Research Imaging Center, University of California Irvine, USA
Orhan Nalcioglu
Research Imaging Center, University of California Irvine, USA

6. Poise: A Novel Approach for Imaging and Detemining The Optical Properties of Turbid Media
Stefan A. Carp, Arnold Guerra and Vasan Venugopalan
University of California, Irvine, USA

7. M.I.D.A.S. (Micro-Dot Array Sensors): Toward a Rapid, In-Vivo, Reproducible, Multianalyte Biosensor Using Microjet Printing Technology
J. Chance Carter, Rosa M. Alvis, Mary T. McBride, Duncan J. Maitland, Bill W. Colston
Medical Technologies Program, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA

8. Goniometric Measurements of Polarized Light Propagation in Biologic Tissues
Kelly Campos, Duncan J. Maitland, Vanitha Sankaran
UC Davis, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA

9. Spectroscopy enhances the information content of optical mammography
Albert Cerussi
Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic

10. Finite Element Analysis of Thermal Residual Stress and Temperature Changes
Yong Seok Chae, Brian J.F. Wong and Enrique J. Lavernia
University of California, Irvine, USA

11. Effect of Menstrual Cycle on the Fluorescence Spectroscopy of the Cervix
Sung K. Chang, Rebecca Richards-Kortum, Urs Utzinger
The University of Texas at Austin, USA
Yusoff Dawood
The University of Texas Health Science Center-Houston, USA
Michele Follen
The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, USA

12. 3D Optical Tomography of Breast based on Intrinsic Contrast Using Measurements from a Hybrid RF/CW Imaging System
Regina Choe, J.P. Culver, T. Durduran, J. Giammarco, L. Zubkov, M.J. Holboke, A.Y. Yodh
Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, USA
X. Intes, B. Chance
Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Pennsylvania, USA

13. Two-Photon Photodynamic Therapy in Confined Spaces
David Cramb, R.L. Goyan
Department of Chemistry, University of Calgary, CANADA

14. Microscopic optical tomography
Andrew Dlugan, Calum MacAulay and Pierre Lane
BC Cancer Agency, CANADA

15. Understanding the Contributions of NADH and Collagen to Cervical Tissue Fluorescence Spectra: Modeling, Measurements, and Implications
Rebekah Drezek, Konstantin Sokolov, Urs Utzinger and Rebecca Richards-Kortum
Biomedical Engineering Program, University of Texas at Austin, USA
Michelle Follen
Department of Gynecologic Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, USA

16. Utilizing A Priori Spectral Knowledge in Diffuse Optical Tomography
Turgut Durduran, J. Giammarco, J.P. Culver, R. Choe, L. Zubkov, M.J. Holboke, A.G. Yodh
Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, USA
S. Nioka and B. Chance
Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, University of Pennsylvania, USA

17. The Importance of Scattering From Small Versus Large Structures in Epithelial Cells
James P. Freyer, Judith R Mourant, Toru Aida, Tamara M. Johnson, Vijaya Doddi and Anabel Guerra
Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA

18. Tri-Modal Spectroscopy for Detecting Cervical Precancerous Lesions In Vivo
Irene Georgakoudi, Markus Mueller, Vadim Backman, Michael S. Feld
G.R. Harrison Spectroscopy Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
Ellen E. Sheets, Chrisopher P. Crum
Brigham & Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, USA

19. Accuracy of 3D Forward Solvers and Precision of Frequency Domain Photon Migration Measurements for Fluorescence Enhanced Optical Imaging
A. Godavarty, R. Roy, D. Hawrysz, E.M. Sevick-Muraca
Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A&M University, USA

20. Solvatochromism of Protoporphyrin IX and Verteporfin
Rebecca L. Goyan, David Cramb, Arbi Rauk and Darren Reid
Department of Chemistry, University of Calgary, CANADA

21. Optical Breakdown Using Nanosecond Laser Pulses Focused at High Numerical Aperture
Arnold Guerra III
Beckman Laser Institute & Medical Clinic, University of California, USA
Alfred Vogel, Kester Nahen
Medical Laser Center, GERMANY
Vasan Venugopalan
University of California, Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, USA

22. Frequency-Domain Photon Migration Assessment of Static Structure Factor of Colloidal Suspensions at Varying Volume Fraction and Ionic Strength
Yingqing Huang, Zhigan Sun and Eva Sevick-Muraca
Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A&M University, USA

23. A Rapid NIR Raman Spectroscopic System for Real-Time in Vivo Skin Raman Measurements
Zhiwei Huang, Haishan Zeng
Cancer Imaging Department, British Columbia Cancer Agency, CANADA
Iltefat Hamzavi, David I. McLean and Harvey Lui
Division of Dermatology, University of British Columbia and Vancouver Hospital and Health Science Centre, CANADA

24. Two-Layered Hemoglobin Oxygenation Measurements
Robert J. Hunter, Michael S. Patterson, Thomas J. Farrell, Joseph E. Hayward
Hamilton Regional Cancer Center and McMaster University, CANADA

25. Development and Characterization of a Broadband Technique for Quantitative Optical Tissue Spectroscopy
Dorota Jakubowski, Frédéric Bevilacqua, Albert E. Cerussi and Bruce J. Tromberg
Beckman Laser Institute, University of California, USA
Andrew J. Berger
The Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, USA

26. NIR, Multi-Exponential Lifetime Spectroscopy in Scattering Media
Eddy Kuwana, Eva M. Sevick-Muraca
Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A&M University, USA

27. Real Time In Vivo Confocal Imaging of Mammary Tumors in Nude Mice Models
Alicia Lacy, Tom Collier, Su Dharmawardhane, Rebecca Richards-Kortum
Biomedical Engineering Program, University of Texas at Austin, USA
Janet Price
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, USA

28. Laser-Activated Shape Memory Polymer Microactuator for Treating Ischemic Stroke
Duncan Maitland, Melodie Metzger, Tom Wilson and Dan Schumann
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA

29. Tomographic Imaging of Port Wine Stain Using Improved Pulsed Photo-Thermal Radiometry Technique
Boris Majaron
Jozef Stefan Institute, SLOVENIA
Wim Verkruysse, Stuart J. Nelson
Beckman Laser Institute, University of California at Irvine, USA
Thomas E. Milner
Biomedical Engineering Program, University of Texas, USA
B. Samuel Tanenbaum
Harvey Mudd College, USA

30. Development of Multiplexed Immunoassays for Detection of BW Agents in an Autonomous Pathogen Detection System
Mary T. McBride, Kodumudi S. Venkateswaran, Bill W. Colston and Richard Langlois
Medical Technology Program, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA

31. Near-Field Measurement of Tissue Optical Properties with a Dual-Size Fiber Probe
Ted Moffitt, Scott Prahl
Oregon Medical Laser Center, USA

32. Development of Probes for Biomedical Raman Spectroscopy
Jason T. Motz, Tae-Woong Koo, Martin A. Hunter, Annika Enedjer and Michael S. Feld
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA

33. Infrared Spectroscopy of Tumorigenic and Non-Tumorigenic Cells
Judith R. Mourant, Yujiro R. Yamada, Tamara M. Johnson, Anabel Guerra and James P. Freyer
Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA

34. Characterizing Oral Tissue With Fluorescence and Reflectance Spectroscopy
Markus G. Mueller, Irene Georgakoudi and Michael S. Feld
Massachussetts Institute of Technology, Spectroscopy Laboratory, USA
Tulio Valdez and Cesar Fuentes
New England Medical Center, USA

35. The Influence of Multi-Fiber Probe Design on Light Propagation During Fluorescence Spectroscopy
Josh Pfefer, Woody Ediger
US Food and Drug Administration, USA
Kevin Schomacker and Norman Nishioka
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA

36. Measurement of Laser Microbeam Characteristics Using Photochromic Films
Kaustubh Rau and Vasan Venugopalan
Center for Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Irvine, USA
Tatiana Krasieva and Bruce Tromberg
Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California, Irvine, USA

37. 3-D Imaging of Absorption Coefficients in Tissue-Like Scattering Media Using Different Error Function
Ranadhir Roy, Eva M. Sevick-Muraca and Anu Godavarty
Texas A&M University, Department of Chemical Engineering, USA

38. The Photophysics of Catecholamines: Fluorescence Characteristics of Neurotransmitters Associated with Clinical Depression
Vanitha Sankaran, Frank Y.S. Chuang
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA
Donald Hilty and Seymour Levine
UC Davis, USA

39. In Search of Molecular Signatures of Cancer By Raman Spectroscopy
Jon R. Schoonover
Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA

40. Polarized Reflectance Spectroscopy In Vivo: What can we Measure?
Konstantin Sokolov, Alexey Myakov, Linda Niemann, Natasha Savchenko, Lorenz Wicky, Urs Utzinger, Rebecca Richards-Kortum
Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, USA
Ann Gillenwater
Department of Heat and Neck Surgery, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, USA

41. Precise Analysis of Frequency Domain Photon Migration Measurement
Zhigang Sun, Eva M. Sevick Muraka
Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A&M University, USA

42. NIR Fluorescence Contrast Enhanced Imaging with ICCD Homodyne Detection: Measurement Precision and Accuracy
Alan B. Thompson, Eva M. Sevick-Muraca
Texas A&M University, USA

43. An IN VIVO Study of Epidermal Protection by Cryogen Spray Cooling During High Fluence Pulsed Laser Irradiation
James W. Tunnell and Bahman Anvari
Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, USA
David Chang and Carol Johnston
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, USA
Sharon Thomsen
Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, USA

44. Multiplex Diagnostic Instrument
Steven R. Visuri, John Chang, Frank Chuang, Bill Colston, Jim Richards
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA

45. Terahertz pulse imaging of skin cancer in-vitro
Vincent P. Wallace
TeraView Ltd.

46. Bridging the Sensitivity Gap Between Phase Based Interferometry Methods and OCT
Changhuei Yang, Adam Wax, Mariah S. Hahn, Ramachandra R. Dasari and Michael S. Feld
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA

47. Use of Photon Migration Techniques to Measure the Optical Properties of Small Tissue Volumes
Joon S. You and Vasan Venugopalan
Biomedical Engineering Program, University of California, Irvine, USA
Carole Hayakawa, Jerome Spanier
Claremont Research Institute of Applied Mathematical Sciences
Frederic Bevilacqua, Andrew K. Dunn and Bruce J. Tromberg
Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic

48. Closed-Loop Optical Coherence Topography for Biological Surface Profiling IN VIVO
Andrei V. Zvyagin, Ilos Eix and David D. Sampson
The University of Western Australia, EleElectrical and Electronic Engineering Department, AUSTRALIA

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